I’m a victim too – I Sympathize with Porn-Star Congresswoman Katie Hill

I sympathize with porn-star congresswoman Katie Hill, really I do. The feeble-minded should be protected from themselves.

When you’re caught doing something dumb, dangerous or criminal, you must immediately  wrap yourself in the mantle of victimhood.

In her last speech to the House yesterday, to a near-empty chamber, Hill said she was a victim of the notorious double-standard: Men who’ve been accused of far worse (the operative word is “accused”) have gotten away with more. Perhaps, but — except for Al Franken — they weren’t dumb enough to leave photographic evidence behind. If that weren’t enough, she was also the victim of something called “revenge porn,” we are told

In a nutshell (which is probably where the one-term Congresswoman belongs), she allowed her ex-husband to take X-rated photos of herself (one with another woman), which he arranged to have posted online. We’ll leave aside the credible accusation that, as a member of Congress, she was involved in what’s called “an inappropriate relationship.”

Did she disrobe in a hypnotic trance? Was any form of coercion involved? She posed for these embarrassing pictures voluntarily, while she was a sitting Congresswoman – in the public eye. Even a Democrat, a Millennial and a Californian should have known that could easily come back to haunt her, say in the course of a messy divorce. Still, she is a victim, she resolutely maintains.

The flight from personal responsibility is the most dangerous trend in society. Psychologist Jordan Peterson has developed a cult following by telling his readers to stand up straight, pick up their rooms, and take responsibility for their actions.

He’s whistling in the dark.

Except for a declining number of adults,  you’re the only one who isn’t responsible for your behavior.

You’re a victim of a sexual double-standard (AKA misogyny, AKA “the patriarchy”). You have a substance-abuse problem. You were raised in poverty (or, alternately, you’re the victim of affluence). You’re a victim of homophobia, police brutality or white privilege. We’ve even created an exculpatory terminology – “victim-blaming.” Instead of criminals, we have “justice-involved persons.”

The decline of personal responsibility fuels the growth of every pathology imaginable – crime, addiction, infidelity, promiscuity, fatherlessness, various forms of bigotry (“If it weren’t for Jewish control of” whatever…), not to mention malpractice litigation with a pot of gold as the end of the rainbow.

It’s all contributed to the stinking societal stew we’re sinking in.

By the way, if you find this commentary objectionable, don’t blame me. I’m the victim of my sarcastic personality, fostered by being raised on Don Rickles and Groucho Marx.
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By |2019-11-03T15:21:53+11:00November 5th, 2019|Identity Politics, Leadership, Sexual Integrity, World|0 Comments

About the Author:

Don Feder was a Boston Herald editorial writer and syndicated columnist from June 1983 to June 2002. For 19 years, his twice-weekly column appeared in the Herald, New England’s second largest newspaper. On February 28, 2002, the paper published his 2,000th column. Feder’s column was syndicated and carried by more than 40 newspapers and e-magazines nationwide. His writings have also appeared in USA TODAY, The Washington Times, The Weekly Standard, National Review, American Enterprise, Front Page Magazine, Human Events, American Thinker and GrassTopsUSA. Feder has traveled extensively in Europe, the Caribbean, Latin America, Africa, and Asia. He is the 1998 recipient of the International Communications Award of the Republic of China on Taiwan. Feder is also the recipient of the 1984 Distinguished Editorial Journalism Award from The Conservative Caucus of America, the 2002 Warren T. Brooks Award from Massachusetts Citizens for Limited Taxation, the Princeton Ivy Leaguers for Freedom Award in October 1999, the Second Amendment Foundation’s 1985 James Madison Award, The World Congress of Families’ 2016 Family And Truth Award and the First Place Prize in the Amy Foundation’s Writing Contest for Projecting Biblical Truths in the Secular Media in 1992. Since leaving the Boston Herald in 2002, Feder has served as a communications consultant, writer and conference organizer for various pro-life and pro-family NGOs. Feder worked with the World Congress of Families from 2006 to May 2018, first as Communications Director, and later as Coalitions Director and Coordinator of Regional Conferences. He was the editor of World Congress of Families News and the organization’s Leadership Memos. He spoke at WCF II (Geneva) WCF III (Mexico City), WCF IV (Warsaw), WCF V (Amsterdam), WCF VI (Madrid), WCF IX (Salt Lake City), WCF X (Tbilisi) and WCF XI (Budapest). He also helped to organize World Congress of Families regional conferences in Trinidad, Barbados, Antigua, St. Lucia, London, Paris, Belgrade, Moldova, Moscow, Ulyanovsk (Russia), Riga (Latvia), Malawi, Abuja (Nigeria), and Nairobi. Besides his work for World Congress of Families, Feder helped to organize The Interfaith Zionist Leadership Summit (2003), The War on Christians Conference (2006) – both in Washington, D.C. -- and The Constitution or Sharia Conference (2011) in Nashville, TN. He is currently the Coalitions Director of the Ruth Institute. Feder is a graduate of the Boston University College of Liberal Arts (BA in political science) and the Boston University Law School (JD). He passed the bar in New York and Massachusetts and practiced law in upstate New York (1973-1976). Prior to writing for the Boston Herald, he was Executive Director of Massachusetts Citizens for Limited Taxation (1976-1979) and the Second Amendment Foundation (1979-1982). He is married to Andrea (formerly Mills), is the father of four children and grandfather of three. He was born sometime in the last century.

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