Freedom-loving Australians attended nationwide rallies in their hundreds of thousands over the weekend. The atmosphere of peace, celebration and united purpose echoed the protest movements of the 1960s-70s.

Big crowds, colourful characters, spirited chanting, plenty of placards, energetic marches, large rallies, defying the system and standing up against corrupt authorities: that was once a big part of my life. It seems it may be once again – well over a half-century later. Let me explain.

Yesterday I joined in the largest protest march that has taken place in Melbourne, if not in all of Australia. Various numbers have been suggested for Saturday’s march for freedom: 100,000, 200,000, 300,000, even 400,000. Of course, the derelict lamestream media did little to cover the event and said idiotic things like that 10,000 showed up. Yeah, right. I was there. It was the biggest event I have ever attended in Australia.

I have been to the MCG with 75,000 footy fans – and that does not compare to what I experienced yesterday. Other cities around the nation also had huge and peaceful marches for freedom and an end to tyranny. I am happy to say that at the very least, 200,000 were at the Melbourne rally. Easily half a million came out around the nation.

 

A Day of Unity, Joy and Celebration

It was a glorious day in Melbourne: ideal weather conditions, a peaceful and passionate march from Parliament House to Flagstaff Gardens, and then rousing speeches to an enormous crowd of supporters. All sorts of people were there: young and old, black and white, families and singles, long-hair and straight, conservative and liberal, and more.

All were united in their stand for freedom and to resist despotic governments and power-drunk politicians and leaders. There were chants and songs, beach balls bouncing around, spontaneous outbursts, people hugging each other, singing and even praying together. There were also wafts of marijuana smoke – I still recognise that smell from over 50 years ago. And no, I did not have any yesterday!

It was all very Woodstock-like. It took me back – it was a deja vu experience. I was reminded of my old hippy days: marching for freedom, resisting tyranny, large rallies with speeches and songs, people of all descriptions being there with a common purpose. Of course, back then, I was not a Christian. But I did have a sense of justice and a passion to find and proclaim truth while standing against injustice.

 

Statism Was Wrong in the 60s and It’s Wrong Now

Back then, we were against Big Brother Statism. We stood against unaccountable and irresponsible governance. We opposed a political system that was unresponsive to the needs of the people, and that was hellbent on simply consolidating more power and control.

That was the purpose of yesterday’s marches as well. It seems I have almost come full circle. I still reject Statist overreach and out-of-control governments. As I told those with me yesterday, it felt just like the old days. Then it was a long-haired teenager marching against a corrupt system; now, I am an old guy marching against a corrupt system.

As spontaneous shouts and songs about freedom erupted all over the place, I was reminded of Richie Havens singing “Freedom” at Woodstock on August 15th, 1969. I told my friends that Havens made it up on the spot – an impromptu performance. The older among us might remember it:

 

The weekend took me back – way back. But now, I have a much better foundation for participating in marches like this. Instead of just loud and angry protests, countless Christians were there, praying and worshipping God. Everywhere I looked, I saw signs and placards featuring Bible verses and Scriptural truths. We did not just come to protest – we came to pray.

The Role of Prayer in Restoring Freedom

As I recently wrote, people power and God power is the necessary combination to pull down strongholds and defeat evil.

It was an amazing day with incredible people who had an unbridled passion and desire to take back our liberties stolen from us by Dan Andrews. Sadly, “ugly thugs” was all that Despot Dan could say about these hundreds of thousands of peaceful and joyous protesters.

I have long been praying for Andrews – either that he is wondrously saved or moved out of the way. It seems he has a heart of stone and is about as much in league with diabolical forces as one can get. I am also praying for his Labor colleagues who still might have enough humanity and conscience left.

 

Maybe when they see these mass marches, they will realise that the gig is up. They might begin to understand that Andrews is a corrupt megalomaniac and buffoon, and it is no longer worthwhile to slavishly support him. It is time for Labor politicians with some civility, rationality and humanity to turn on this tyrant and give him the boot. Would you please pray to that end?

Saturday was one of the most encouraging and hope-filled days I have had in the past 20 months. It looks like the tide is turning. There is a real shift. A shift in the heavenlies results in changes here in the political, social and cultural realms.

Check out this video of the great veteran John Murphy speaking to the crowd at Melbourne.

Your Role in Ending Tyranny

It was not just Melbournians who came in their tens of thousands: numerous busloads full of people made the trip from rural Victoria. It was a state-wide protest. The whole state of Victoria has had enough of dictatorial lockdowns and assaults on our freedoms.

People are fed up with the health mandates, the forced injections, the discrimination and the two-tiered system. Australians will no longer sit in silence; they will not be bullied by the autocrats and political power-trippers. They want their freedom.

A half-century ago, we also marched for freedom. A yearning for liberty has long been a part of the human heart. As G. K. Chesterton said in The Everlasting Man:

If there is one fact we really can prove, from the history that we really do know, it is that despotism can be a development, often a late development and very often indeed the end of societies that have been highly democratic. A despotism may almost be defined as a tired democracy. As fatigue falls on a community, the citizens are less inclined for that eternal vigilance which has truly been called the price of liberty; and they prefer to arm only one single sentinel to watch the city while they sleep.

We all must stand up and be counted here. Who will join me at next week’s rally?

Originally published at CultureWatch. Image via The Guardian.