Rachel Borneman

About Rachel Borneman

Rachel Borneman Ngarritjan, photographed here with Anderson George Balang, grew up in a missionary linguist family in the Northern Territory and now serves with Wycliffe Bible Translators as a support worker with Kriol-speaking communities along the Central Arnhem Highway east of Katherine. Rachel is not Indigenous and so has little personal experience of traditional ceremony. She therefore chooses to leave it to Indigenous Christians, who do have such experience, to work out with the Holy Spirit the compatibility of those ceremonies with Christianity.

Rachel professed Christianity and was welcomed into an indigenous Australian community at the age of five, when she was given her skin name, ‘Narritjan’. While completing her education in Darwin, she co-led camps and coordinated ISCF (high school) groups with Scripture Union Northern Territory (SUNT). When she left Darwin in 2000 to train with Youth With A Mission (YWAM), it became increasingly clear that her gifting was working with indigenous peoples, so she returned to Darwin and worked for six years with indigenous high school students. She is currently working with indigenous adults to develop Kriol materials specifically designed for children and youth and to address youth-at-risk issues.
6 01, 2020

Why Aboriginal Ceremonies are Incompatible with Christianity ~ an Indigenous man’s view

By |2020-01-10T18:01:26+11:00January 6th, 2020|Australia, Faith, Indigenous|10 Comments

Anderson George Balang's View of Aboriginal Christian Spirituality. Anderson George is a Wuagalak Aboriginal man who now lives on Jawoyn country, Wugularr community (also known as Beswick, located 110 kilometres east of Katherine in the Northern Territory). Anderson's Christian experience is foundationally shaped by his ...read more